Deep dive into Hawaii's traditional cuisine

Publish Date: 2021-12-01 By: Priyanka's Team
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Deep dive into Hawaii's traditional cuisine

POKE

POKE

Poke is just the Hawaiian counterpart of Japanese sashimi (raw fish), and it doesn't get much better than that for anyone – makes us fall in love and addicted. When people return to Hawaii to see relatives, poke is always the first thing on their menu.

Hawaiian poke is presented in bite-sized meaty chunks rather than thinly sliced fish like Japanese sashimi. The most prevalent type of fish is ahi (tuna), but a variety of other fresh saltwater fish are also often utilised.

CHICKEN LONG RICE

CHICKEN LONG RICE

Chicken long rice is not really a traditional Hawaiian dish, however, it has subsequently spread into many Hawaiian luaus and dinners.

Chicken long rice is a Chinese-inspired meal that consists of transparent mung bean noodles cooked in chicken broth. As a consequence, you get a slurpy stew with transparent noodles, bits of chicken, and sometimes a lovely gingery taste. Eating chicken long rice works extremely well with a complete Hawaiian lunch.

KALUA PIG

KALUA PIG

The legendary pig dish known as Kalua Pig is another Hawaiian culinary titan.

Slow-roasted in a subterranean oven (known as an imu), the pork becomes incredibly soft while retaining a wonderful smokey taste.

The flavour of the kalua pig is similar to that of southern American pulled pork, but instead of the acidic barbecue sauce, it has a pungent wood smoke flavour. Kalua pig, in my view, pairs well with a heaping dish of rice!

POI

POI

Poi is a basic and traditional filler starch dish in Hawaiian cuisine.

Poi is a thick paste produced from taro root (similar to yam or potato but with a starchier taste) that is steamed or baked and crushed. Water is added to the mixture while crushing to generate an extremely sticky pudding-like consistency.

Poi has a distinct flavour that is starchy and slightly sour because of the minor fermentation that occurs throughout the cooking process. While in Hawaii, you can't get enough poi, although you’ll appreciate that the flavour and texture take some getting used to. To make your bowl of poi even better, add a little Lomi-Lomi fish.

LAULAU

LAULAU

Laulau, one of the most popular meals on our Hawaiian cuisine list, would not be complete without traditional Hawaiian food. Taro is a well-known plant not just in Hawaii, but also in Polynesia and the Pacific islands. Laulau is created from the leaves of the taro plant, whereas poi is made from the root.

Laulau is traditionally made with pork wrapped in layers of taro leaves and roasted for hours in an underground hot rock oven until tender and smokey flavoured. The flesh is soft and juicy, and the leaves have a spinach-like consistency.

In Hawaii, you may readily get fish, chicken, or pork laulau.

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Priyanka Aradhye

Priyanka Aradhye

#Author, #Blogger, #Health #Lifestyle

Hi, I am Priyanka. I am a statistician and a blogger. I love things related to a healthy lifestyle. Follow me for more. @chilli_clove.
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